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Iguanodontia


Iguanodontia
|-?"Mandschurosaurus" laosensis
|-?Muttaburrasaurus langdoni
|  |
|  |-Tenontosaurus tillettorum
|  |-Tenontosaurus dossi
|     |
|     |-Rhabdodon priscus
|     |-Rhabdodon septimanicus
|
|-Euiguanodontia
   |-Gasparinisaura cincosaltensis
      |
      |-Dryomorpha
         |-?Anabisetia saldiviai
         |
         |-Dryosauridae
         |  |-Dryosaurus altus
         |  |-Dryosaurus lettowvorbecki
         |  |-Valdosaurus canaliculatus
         |  |-Valdosaurus nigeriensis
         |  |-Valdosaurus dextrapoda
         |  |-?Kangnasaurus coetzeei
         |
         |-Ankylopollexia
            |-Camptosauridae
            |  |-Camptosaurus dispar
            |  |-Camptosaurus leedsi
            |  |-Camptosaurus prestwichii
            |  |-?Camptosaurus depressus
            |  |-Draconyx loureiroi
            |
            |-Styracosterna
               |-?Eolambia caroljonesa
               |  |
               |  |-Probactrosaurus gobiensis
               |  |-Probactrosaurus alashanicus
               |  |-Probactrosaurus mazongshanensis
               |
               |-Iguanodontoidea
                  |-Iguanodon bernissartensis
                  |-Iguanodon anglicus
                  |-Iguanodon atherfieldensis
                  |-Iguanodon dawsoni
                  |-Iguanodon fittoni
                  |-Iguanodon hoggi
                  |-Iguanodon lakotaensis
                  |-Iguanodon ottingeri
                     |
                     |-Hadrosauroidea


Iguanodontids were probably the most successfull of all herbivorous dinosaurs, maybe except for
the hadrosaurs. Iguanodontids had a little thumb spike to defend themselves with, although
they may have had to be pretty precise to hit right, to do damage, and not only piss the attacking
predator even more off.

Iguanodontids are found all over the world, in all continents except Antarctica.
Even in Spitzbergen there are footprints of what may have been a slightly overgrown I. bernissartensis
Members of Dryosauridae and Camptosaurinae were bipedal and semi bipedal, in contrary to Styracosternids which
were quadrupedal, but that probably could run bipedally.

 

 

 
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